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artist
MOC

Who are MOC?


(Anatol Locker: elektron madness, monomachine, glitch & non-glitch, mixing)
(Wolfgang Schmetterer: producing, mixing, text, vocal, bits & echoes)

Das Duo MOC

MOC, which are Wolfgang Schmetterer and Anatol Locker. Both run for years in Munich Glockenbachviertel past each other. But they live just 50 meters distance apart. A mutual friend brings the two together. With a cautious sniff at half the distance and a common "Yes, let's see, what will happen." they began to collaborate.

They come from different directions. Schmetterer learned playing bass and all just because of dub. He thinks Illbient is a very straight thing and plays for many years hustling garage music - his band "Jemand" is known throughout the city. Schmetterer not only can play instruments but also radio plays and such. His weapon is not Word, but ASCII - just "listen only in your own head ...". As "Magentaa" he published palatable electronica and allows himself to offset with the production of country songs.

Locker learns piano, but he's with electronics, computers, small technical devices. He experimented with Ambient (including "Disquiet Junto"), finds new music collage techniques, designes sounds using the iPad. He plays regularly at Dance Jam collective "Ambiosonics". Anatol holds a Game Boy for a full-blown musical instrument and a dial for a great invention of mankind.

http://magentaa.taigaland.net
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Interview


The big MOC-summer-2019 interview for your plaisir.

# ABOUT MOC - INTRODUCTION

Where on earth would you like to be?

Anatol: Far away from the hustle and bustle.

Wolfgang: I have nothing to add to that.

Do you currently have favourite drinks or a favourite meal?

Wolfgang: Tea in all variations, preferably green semi-shade from Japan. Dark chocolate. Krautwickerl. Crème brûlée. Ice cream. Actually everything except dill.

Anatol: Water. Mother's apricot jam. Dumplings. A good fast noodle. Ice. And no dill either, except in cucumber salad.

What moments do you really like?

Wolfgang: The runner_s high after a 10 km run across the forest. The magic moment in the studio, when everything fits: the light, the performance, the people and everyone looking at each other in amazement. Playing electric bass and singing background. And when Anatol shows up in the studio with an inspiring new device and the next five tracks are happening like as if they made themselves.

Anatol: When Wolfgang has brought to life a K-Pop star out of a North Korean newsreader via vocoder. Short wave gnashing. The moment when you turn in the bass on a very, very good PA. And when the postman with the new delicious part for the modular synth is just around the corner.

# YOUR MUSIC

Please tell our readers something about your musical production process. Do you produce music together in the studio or how do you do it?

Anatol: We record countless tracks in Wolfgang's studio for weeks, which we then thin out over the course of months. MOC needs time and wants to take its time.
We've been working on the current release for almost 5 years. This time we had planned to get along with less tracks. We started with three recordings each, which we played to each other and then expanded. Of course we immediately kicked the good intention and produced more tracks than ever - which we then rigorously thinned out and reworked again.

Wolfgang: We like to work with music hardware and software, but we also use a cordless screwdriver or 3D printer as percussion sound. Hardware like a real electric piano, the good old Fender Precision Bass and various drumboxes provide tempo and tension in the creative process. We then mount the recordings on the computer in a new context, which is actually most of the work. There are several changes, discarded and repainted.

Anatol: I think "in love with detail" is the right vocabulary here. The fine-tuning of sound design, mixing and mastering alone took a good year for "Chats". The pieces have also changed a lot over the years. Actually this release is the distillate of three albums.


What is your musical origin? Where do you come from and where are you now? How did it come to your current musical style?

Wolfgang: I clearly come from the 80s, from post-punk: Everything is new - and always, no presets, no standards. Essential and creative for me is Dub. The transition, the version, the incomplete. I like beautiful melodies in general, also in bass. And I like energy, be it in punk or the fat beats of boom bap hiphop.

Anatol: My musical socialization is somewhere between the Beatles and Can. I can listen to an ambient drone for hours and I'm always looking for the sound I haven't heard yet. And for the next device that gives me the inspiration kick.

Wolfgang: Our common MOC style is based on long, trusting and above all respectful cooperation. We have fun with the same musical things and also no problem with being stuck back when the other has the better idea. We play when we work on music. There are no prohibitions or anything like that. What wants to be tried out is tried out, no matter how long it takes.


"MOC" - what does your name actually mean?

Wolfgang: Actually everything started with a visit to Vienna. I was there at the "MAK", the museum for applied art. They were there on the funnel that they wanted to raise the museum super-corporate, so with a pocket-sized catalogue, a "CEO" (a.k.a. museum director), a "mission statement" (a.k.a. foreword), etc. We then immediately recorded a track in which we took the hollow word production of the MAK for a ride.

Anatol: And since then we are "MOC". There are of course 3000 other meanings of the abbreviation, an event center of the same name in Munich and it also has a certain resemblance to "MUC", the Munich airport, but we are now "MOC". Maybe "the MOC.


"MOC" - what does your name actually mean?

Wolfgang: Actually everything started with a visit to Vienna. I was there at the "MAK", the museum for applied art. They were there on the funnel that they wanted to raise the museum super-corporate, so with a pocket-sized catalogue, a "CEO" (a.k.a. museum director), a "mission statement" (a.k.a. foreword), etc. We then immediately recorded a track in which we took the hollow word production of the MAK for a ride.

Anatol: And since then we are "MOC". There are of course 3000 other meanings of the abbreviation, an event center of the same name in Munich and it also has a certain resemblance to "MUC", the Munich airport, but we are now "MOC". Maybe "the MOC.


What do you need to know about your current release "Chats"?

Anatol: "Chats" is for people with very open ears. An attack on convenience and bad habits. Probably an imposition for dogmatists and pragmatists. A plea for the new and unusual.

Wolfgang: "Chats" is music for endurance athletes. The results are sustainable, but you won't see them for 5 years. And all this happens in less than 30 minutes!

Anatol: "Chats" is a musical cat video - in the here and now. A bit cuddly, but also with claws. The Melvins play Twitter.

Do you play live sometimes or would you like to play?

Wolfgang: Give us money and we'll play live again.

What do you do musically besides MOC?

Wolfgang: I have recorded, produced, mixed and mastered two songwriter-pop albums for other artists over the last few years. I'm also working on new material for my solo project "Magentaa". And then there will be a cooperation with a great singer from Munich soon. Musically it's in the slow electronic sector, but I can't tell you more about it yet.

Anatol: Besides MOC I currently have three other musical projects: Live-Elektronica with Ambiosonics, the musical challenge "Disquiet Junto" and the modular synthesizer duo Lucid Grain with Martha Bahr.


# MUSIC IN THE NET

What do you think about all the developments and stands about music on the internet? There has been a lot going on in recent years.

Wolfgang: I've found the net music trends more exciting before, especially in the noughties. The mashup culture was great, it only existed through the Internet. Today I see above all micro scene heroes of the radiance of a garden gnome. I often don't see the bigger connections, such as a Spex in the 80s and 90s. Pop culture has also shifted - away from music towards more visual genres such as games and video.


Is there any network labels or other artists on the net that you would recommend?

Anatol: I think the daily tips from Bandcamp are great for finding new music. Also, the Disquiet Junto project and the Lines forum (https://llllllll.co) are a constant source of inspiration for me.

Wolfgang: I try not to be too impressed by the net and the 1000 possibilities. When I'm too much online or in media overkill, I feel like I don't have any ideas anymore. So I prefer to go out into nature - there come the new connections, the ideas all by themselves.

Anatol: We both really like musicians from a Billie Eilish. A new level of pop content and sound is emerging. And that's very, very well done.

Wolfgang: Apart from that: The Dresden netlabel "Phonocake" is an old favourite of ours. We are especially happy that we are allowed to release here and that they appreciate and support our already somewhat eccentric music so much. Thanks a lot!

# LOCAL

Do you actually have an Electronica subculture scene in Munich? Or in general: what is actually going on in MUC or Bavaria??

Anatol: There is a well-mixed subculture scene in Bavaria, especially in hip hop, electronica, experimental, jazz and techno. But I don't depend on the scenes because I'd rather do something myself than consume it. Sounds elitist, but it's not meant that way. I simply prefer to be in the studio rather than in a mediocre concert.

Wolfgang: I prefer watching The Melvins live rather than electronic music. The interaction is more direct and exciting.

Anatol: But in the area of electronica a lot has happened in Munich in recent years. Most of it happens at festivals, for example DigitalAnalog, Knobs and Wires or Ambient Waves.



#Best Practice

What is the best advice you would give to other musicians?

Wolfgang: Open your eyes when choosing your environment. Something I learned while cycling: If you want to be the fastest, it doesn't help much to give everything - 357 other cyclists will be faster. The promising strategy is to ride where nobody else rides. The forest is your friend, nobody overtakes you here.

Anatol: Tip number 1: Do your thing. You'd better hit tracks faster than slower (unless you're MOC). The more regularly you publish, the faster you find your audience. Tip number 2: Find like-minded people and improvise together. That way you find your voice faster and learn to keep your mouth shut musically. Tip number 3: Never, never, never just turn the lowpass filter only. Otherwise you'll sound like a million other boring songs.


 
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